Marketing On A Budget


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Marketing On A Budget
How To Squeeze The Juice Out Of Your Marketing.

Terry:
All right, welcome aboard! Today we are very lucky to have Ty Cohen with us. Were going to be working on a Marketing From the Masters Workshop today. Ty Cohen is a multitalented guy; he is a music industry mogul, a real estate industry entrepreneur, and a master marketing coach. He is a very well rounded individual.

If you go ahead and Google Ty, you will see that you get 1.2 listings out there and two pages worth of material (books, courses, etc) listed on Amazon. Im willing to bet that he has more marketing knowledge in his baby finger nail than most people have in an entire lifetime. Now, without further ado, I would like to welcome Ty here today and just say thanks for being here today with us, Ty.

Ty:
Hey Terry, I appreciate you having me on a call. I just wanted to say that, when you said 1.2 listings I think you meant to say 1.2 million listings.

Terry:
Did I say 1.2 listings? I meant 1.2 million listings; I have to clarify.

Ty:
You almost gave me a heart attack. I know Google does a lot of dances; they do the Google shake and Google break dance, as I like to call it. So I was like, Google screwed me over overnight I looked at it last night and it was at 1.2 million or something like that and now Im down to 1.2 listings.

Terry:
Nope, its 1.2 million. I got the stats a little bit wrong there.

Ty:
Good, I can sleep easy tonight. I thought it was back to square one for me.

Terry:
Nope, youre still on top, buddy. Alright, Ty, maybe we can start off with your background and you can tell us where you came from and how you got where you are today.

Ty:
Sure. My parents had eight children; Im the second youngest of eight children. I actually grew up in Bridgeport, Connecticut, which is about 20 or 30 minutes away from New York City. It wasnt always Certs for me. I mean Certs the candy; it wasnt always sweet or honky-dory for me. I grew up in one of the worst housing projects in Connecticut. The crime rate was pretty bad and it was pretty much the ghetto.

I was born with Sickle Cell Anemia, which is a disease that affects certain minorities. Out of the eight children, two of us, myself and one of my siblings, had Sickle Cell Anemia. My older sister unfortunately passed away from having Sickle Cell Anemia. When I was young, the doctors told me I wasnt going to live past the age of 17.

So, that was my outlook; my reality was hearing the doctor tell my parents to have as much fun with me now because I wasnt going to live past my teens and hes not going to become an adult. Hearing a professional person or a role model say that was devastating to say the least, wouldnt you think?

Terry:
Im just standing here with my jaw wide open. Thats unbelievable.

Ty:
Right. And that became my reality, which was devastating to me. I was about ten years old when my sister passed away. I remember to this day getting the call, it was just me and my older brother at home because my parents were at work, and my sister had been put in a hospice; she was about 24 or 25 years old.

We got the call at about two in the afternoon and my older brother picked up the phone and before I even hear him say anything I see tears coming out of his eyes. He just dropped the phone and at that moment I knew what that call was about, even though I was only ten years old. It didnt take much to figure it out. Nevertheless, that had a traumatic effect on me.

With that in mind, I was also thinking that I had about six or seven years left until I was the next one. When I was about 16 or 17 years old, I started living a destructive lifestyle. I didnt think much of myself, I didnt have much self-esteem, and I didnt expect to live much longer.

Luckily for me, I had a set of strong parents. They had gotten divorced by the time I had gotten into my teens, but my dad always came around and had time for the kids. He always showed us that youre supposed to have a strong worth ethic. My dad was not a professional guy; he didnt have a college degree and he didnt even finish high school, but he always worked multiple jobs to take care of me, my brothers, my sisters, and my mom, even though they were separated.

I think that was a strong point for me, even though I had my mom as a strong family figure. She always encouraged me and my siblings to shoot for our goals and dreams and said that we were always able to accomplish anything that we wanted, so I thank God for having my mom in my life.

Needless to say, I didnt pass away at 17; Im here right now in my early 30s. My very first job was a summer job that I had at the age of 15, and I worked for a pharmacy called Walgreens Pharmacy. I worked as a stock boy for about two years there, then I quit.

After about three weeks, my mom made me go back and ask for my job back. The reason why she did that, was no because of the money, but because she didnt want to instill that quitter attitude in me. With everything else I was facing, having Sickle Cell Anemia, and living in one of the worst areas in the country, she wanted me to know how important it was to stay mentally focused to reach your dreams and your goals.

So, from going from a stock person at Walgreens, I went to an Assistant Manager in about a years time. By the time I was 18 I was the Assistant Manager; I was one of the youngest assistant managers in that companys history.

Terry:
Wow.

Ty:
Two years later, I became a store manager. My passion was always comic books and things like that. I used to collect comics; I had thousands of them. I lost most of the in a fire that we had, but I was always passionate about comic books. Even to this day I took my kids to see Spiderman 3 and I think I enjoyed it than all the four and five year old kids that were there.

So, being so passionate about comics, I started a business. The business that I started dealt with toy collectables, because I always used to collect the comic book action figures. Thats a huge industry; there are tons of collectors. These guys have seminars, workshops, and forums about all this stuff. I really got into this, and when I found out there were other guys like me, there were tens of thousands of guys who love to collect action figures, I was like Whoa Im in heaven. That was my first love.

So, when I was about 22 years old, I started a business. I also still worked at Walgreens for about 10-12 hours, and on the side I was running my business. It wasnt really a business to me because I loved it so much. I was just thrilled that people were paying me money to sit here and talk to them about something I love and to give them insight and share my knowledge with them about my hobby of collecting comics and action figures.

I held nationwide conventions and seminars and things like that. I would attend seminars from state to state and things like that. I eventually quit Walgreens Pharmacy because I was making about ten times more money with my collectable toy business than I was making at Walgreens Pharmacy.




Keywords: budget;marketing;squeeze
File Size: 30.6 MBytes

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